Make your own free website on Tripod.com

dta.jpg

Simple Strategies

Home
Contact The D.T.A.
What is The DTA?
What is Dyslexia?
Dyslexic Teachers
Mentors
Colleagues
Skills Tests
Dyslexia Test
Forum
Your Stories
Links
Membersip
The D.T.A. Constitution

Don't panic!

On this page
 
The Disability Discrimination Act
 
 
Lesson planning
 
Writing on a whiteboard
 
Report writing, Incident report writing, letters to parents and other paperwork
 
Remembering pupil’s names
 
 Remembering dates/timetables
 
Organisation
 
Mathematics in the class room
 
Checking written work
 
Reading documents
 
 
Colleagues that do not understand your proplems
 
Ridiculing from teachers, pupils or parents
 
Lack of self confidence in writing
 
Lack of support from mentors or senior staff

The Disability Discrimination Act

 

Dyslexia and other SpLD are described in the Disability Discrimination Act.

 

This means that Employers must permit "reasonable adjustment" to allow you to do your work.

 

The strategies listed here should fall within the grounds of "reasonable adjustment". However if there are any problems please contact The D.T.A. or, if necessary your Union.

Lesson planing

 

1.       Try to develop your own lesson plans, as this way you will

          understand why you are doing things.

 

2.       Be very specific with aims.

 

3.       Do not panic if a lesson doesn't run to plan.

 

4.       Use "Memory Mapping" to develop your ideas.

 

5.      Design a layout for your plan that you are comfortable with - this

         can take the form of a "Memory Map".

 

Writing on a white board

 

1.       Before writing on the board type out and spell check the text

          that you will be writing.

 

2.       Get pupils to write on the board.

 

3.       Get pupils to search for words that you are unsure of in

          dictionaries or on spell checks as you write.

 

4.       If using an interactive white board, type, spell check and save

          notes that can be put up using word.

 

5.       Have commonly used subject words on the walls.

 

6.       Have a copy of words that you usually get wrong on your desk.

 

7.       Ask pupils to spot the “deliberate” mistakes.

         

 

Report writing, Incident report writing, letters to parents and other paperwork

 

1.       Write in pencil first – check through your self, or get someone else to – then go over in pen, (this stops you from

          copying wrongly).

 

2.       Create a template on Microsoft word for all reports and letters

          to parents. Type out and spell check each one.

 

3.       Ask someone else to proof read.

 

Remembering pupils' names

 

1.       For the first few lessons play name games with pupils:

  • Ask them to link their name with something that they like.
  • Ask them to link their name with an action.

2.       Ask pupils to create name stickers / place names on their

          table to use every lesson.

 

3.       Use a seating plan – have a copy on your desk.

 

4.       Write distinguishing features (eg. hair colour) next to names on

          the register.

 

 Remembering dates/timetables

 

1.       Use a page/day diary

 

2.       Have a calendar in a prominent place at home and in the

          classroom

 

3.       Use a small white board, at home or school, to write down

          important dates that are coming up.

 

4.       Use an electronic diary/planner

 

5.       Associate pictures with dates

 

Organisation

 

1.       File each classes work in different coloured files

 

2.       Use a filing cabinet at home or at school

 

3.       Keep colours consistent through all paperwork

 

4.       Create a weekly timetable that includes the aims of lessons

          and the resources that you will need.

 

5.       Keep a small note book and a pen with you at all times to write

          down things as you think of them – read through each evening.

 

6.       Use an electronic diary/planner

 

7.       Try to have a place for everything in your classroom

 

8.       Use a "Traffic Lights System" to detemine what needs to be

          done now, and what can wait.

 

9.       Use "Memory Mapping" to organise your ideas.

 

Mathematics in the class room

 

1.       Use the opportunity to help pupils with their maths by asking them to do the sums.

 

Checking written work

 

1.       Read through and circle in pencil things that you are unsure of,

          check on a spell check or with another member of staff.

          Remark in pen.

 

2.       Peer marking. Give pupils marking criteria and ask pupils to

          mark each others work.

 

3.       Self marking. Give pupils marking criteria and ask them to

           mark their own work.

 

Reading documents

 

1.       Where possible ask for documents to be given to you to view

          on the computer. Before reading separate each paragraph

          with a line in between - this separates the reading into smaller

          chunks.

 

2.       Read somewhere where you will have few distractions. Do not

          read in a busy area or near a window.

 

3.       While reading highlight sentences that are important, go back

          over the sentences after reading.

 

4.       If possible and necessary, ask if you can be given documents in note form.

 

5.       If you suffer from problems reading black text on white (Irlen

          Syndrome) ask for documents to be printed on coloured paper

         or use a coloured over lay. (Most people prefer yellow;

         however, pink, blue and green are also common).  

 

Colleagues that do not understand your problems

 

1.       Explain to a member of staff exactly what your problems are.

 

2.       Ask staff to research into adult dyslexia, or provide them with research.

 

3.       Ask staff to read the Mentors and Colleagues sections of this website.

 

Ridiculing from teachers, pupils or parents

 

1.       Remember that all people have difficulties in someway. In most cases it may be better to explain that you are dyslexic rather than trying to hide it.

 

2.       You are not alone, talk to other members of staff or contact this site for individual support.

 

3.       If problems continue consider contacting your union.

 

Lack of self confidence in writing

 

1.       Try to use the methods mentioned above to gain confidence

 

2.       Read the Self Confidence page in this site

 

3.       You are not alone in having problems, talk to other members of staff or contact this site for individual support.

 

Lack of support from mentors or senior staff

 

1.       Explain to a member of staff exactly what your problems are and what support you will need.

 

2.       Give staff time to help you. If you are asking for documents to be printed on coloured paper give notice in good time.

 

3.       Recommend to staff that they read the Mentors and Colleagues sections of this website.

 

4.      Talk to another member of staff.

 

5.      Contact The D.T.A. through the forum or e-mail dyslexicteachers@yahoo.co.uk

 

6.      Look for a personal Dyslexia mentor, possibly outside of the school

 

7.       If problems continue, consider contacting your union.

Enter supporting content here